Posts tagged Guidance
Early Intervention Foundation Resource: "Reducing Parental Conflict"

A guide produced by the Early Intervention Foundation originally for commissioners and leaders of services for children and families on how to engage with disadvantaged and vulnerable parents and how to reduce the impact of parental conflict on the physical health, mental health and emotional wellbeing of children.

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Kidney Research UK Resource Pack for Schools

A resource pack compiled by Kidney Research UK for use in primary and secondary schools to talk about kidney health for use on World Kidney Day which happens annually on the 14th March. The resource pack includes information on how the kidneys work, activities and games to reinforce key information and links to organisations students can get in touch with if they want to find out more about kidney health.

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Relationships Education, Relationships and Sex Education and Health Education Statutory Guidance February 2019

The Department for Education has published their amended Relationships Education for Primary Schools, Relationships and Sex Education for Secondary Schools and Health Education statutory guidance following consultation with key stakeholder groups. Core areas covered in the guidance include mental health and emotional wellbeing, puberty, online safety, basic First Aid and healthy and unhealthy relationships.

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United Kingdom Chief Medical Officers' Commentary on 'Screen-based activities and children and young people's mental health and psychosocial wellbeing: a systematic map of reviews

A commentary of research carried out by University College London which explores the range of screen-based activities that children and young people perform and the effect that has on their mental health and emotional wellbeing. 82 reviews conducted between 2007 and 2018 are explored, covering activities such as social media use, internet use, sexting and smartphone use.

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Young Minds Resources on Addressing Childhood Adversity and Trauma

A PowerPoint Presentation compiled by Young Minds to help SLT professionals to talk to junior teachers about identifying the signs of common Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) of students in their classes and looking at ways of mitigating their effects on children’s mental health, emotional wellbeing and academic performance.

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Measuring and monitoring children and young people’s mental wellbeing: A Public Health England toolkit for schools and colleges

A comprehensive toolkit produced by Public Health England for SLT in schools and colleges to raise awareness amongst school and college staff of the range of validated tools that are available to help measure subjective mental wellbeing amongst the student population. This, in turn, will help school and college leaders make use of school and college level data to identify the mental wellbeing needs of students and determine how best to address these.

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Staying Safe 4 Mental Health Website

The Staying Safe website is a resource developed by 4 Mental Health, with input from international academics, mental health practitioners, people who have survived suicidal thoughts and those personally affected by suicide through bereavement.

The website provides a number of ‘Safety Plan’ guidance tools with easy-to-use to templates and guidance video tutorials purposefully designed to help people through the process of writing their own Safety Plan. A Safety Plan helps to build hope, identify actions and strategies to resist suicidal thoughts and develop positive ways to cope with stress and emotional distress.

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The Health Impacts of Screen Time: A Guide for Clinicians and Parents

The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) has published guidance for clinicians and parents on screen time use and the effects of screen time on children and young people. A systematic review of evidence found that children with higher screen time tend to have: a less healthy diet, a higher energy intake, and more pronounced indicators of obesity; more depressive symptoms, although it has been found by some studies that some screen time is better for mental health than none at all. 

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